A Bridge too Far
 

 

 

 

There is also a great deal of humour in the movie (most of it slightly off kilter and terribly British). The contrast between Caine and Goulds character, Major Wells with his umbrella, Sean Connerys comment about God being a Scotsman. There are lovely and tragic moments scattered thoughout the film which give careful insight into the humour sometimes discovered in combat situations.

A finally note should be made of Attenborough’s attention to historical detail. From the weapons they use such as the Piat against the tanks, to the type of house to house street fighting, Major Gen Urquhart getting cut off and the Germans finding the allied plans. Seldom have I know a film that claims to follow a true story that has such rigorous attention to historical events. In order to achieve this they pulled in lots of military and technical advisors [if you've watched the film you may know some of these names].

John Frost
James M. Gavin
Frank A. Gregg
Brian Horrocks
Kathryn Morgan Ryan
R.E. Urquhart
J.O.E. Vandeleur
Cornelius Van Eijk

There is a lovely vinette that during the shooting of Hopkins run between buildings Johnny Frost who retired as a Major General said at one point:

'No no dear boy I don't run like that'

They reshot the scene twice with Hopkins being covered each time up debris from the explosions. Eventually they kept the original take as the most believable!

On a final military note Montgomery made a mistake with this one, a big one but I’ve noted how willing my American friends were to blanket him with being a poor general. I’m not getting into debate here but suffice to say it is well documented that he acted with consummate skill in Africa against arguably on of the best military commanders of this century. Patton had a picnic in the park.

John Addison's music score will have you humming along for a number of days and the CD is well worth buying. Oh and the Special Edition DVD is just out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                

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A bridge too far