Kind hearts and Coronets

 

                   

 

 

That's where Sir Alec Guinness comes in. In a chameleon-like performance that puts Peter Sellers's in "Dr. Strangelove" to shame, he plays all eight of Louis's victims, including a fisherman, a photographer, and even a feminist (in which he bears a startling resemblance to Susan B. Anthony). When Louis murders the photographer (by planting explosives in his darkroom), he perversely woos his widow, the lovely and morally upright Edith (Valerie Hobson). Louis is so cool and calculating that it comes as no surprise when he gets what he wants. What he doesn't count on, though, is an unpleasant hindrance known as karma…Anyway Dennis Price has a difficult task facing off against Guinness in so many scenes, but he does a fine job. His voice, reciting the history of his terrible crimes against his own family, is smooth and untroubled throughout, blandly describing the unfortunate death of each d'Ascoigne, and even a few bystanders.

Much has been said about a remake of this film – somewhat along the lines of ‘The Lady Killers’ – I have to say I think this would be a mistake. Hamer got the shooting and actors down to near perfect [especially for the period]. It's a very British movie. The understatement is almost overstated. Only two of the murdered people die on screen - one peacefully. I cannot see an American remake of this without a lot of on screen blood and violence which, in my humble opinion, would drain the story of much of its humour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                          

Main Films                                      Page 1     

Kind hearts and Coronets